Facebook, Instagram declare war on revenge porn

Facebook, Instagram declare war on revenge porn

Facebook, Instagram declare war on revenge porn

Social media mogul Facebook has launched safe community initiatives, and as the first order, it has cracked down on illegal sharing of intimate pictures and videos - often called as "revenge porn" - by jilted lovers on its website.

Facebook said that 93% USA victims of non-consensual intimate images report significant emotional distress and 82% report significant impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of their life.

The new tools which are available on the network from today allow users to report intimate images which they believe have been shared without consent.

When the picture has been shared, it can be reported to Facebook and will be reviewed by a member of their Community Operations team.

Once an image has been removed, Facebook will use photo-matching technology - similar to a reverse image search - to prevent further copies of the image being shared on its platforms.

While explaining the new tool, Facebook cites a study of USA victims of non-consensual intimate image sharing.

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Davis said these tools, developed in partnership with safety experts, are an example of the potential technology has to help keep people safe.

The company also noted in its blog that it worked with other organizations to create resources for people who become victims of revenge porn.

Users will be able to notify them if they suspect a graphic image was shared without permission by clicking on the "report" button on the post.

Facebook clearly states in his community guidelines that revenge porn is prohibited and it will take down any content that violates its policy. Users can already appeal when an image is reported for non-consensual sharing.

In a statement, the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative said that Facebook has now "raised the bar for the tech industry's response to online abuse". It becomes hard for victims of non-consensual porn to remove images of themselves from the Internet, as it is easy to re-share photos that have been taken down in other places.

Davis told the BBC that the company is working towards finding a way to prevent initial posting of such imagery, but in the meantime they're still depending on users to flag images. Facebook made a guide to lead victims through that process, which you can find here.

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