Apple demands cut of Chinese app 'tips'

Apple demands cut of Chinese app 'tips'

Apple demands cut of Chinese app 'tips'

Apple's decision legitimizes tipping and shows that the company is trying to make monetization easier on both customers and app developers. It's one of the most egregious things an app developer can do, but Apple now plans massively restrain the review prompt system to help protect users. Among the many ways that our apps get on our nerves is when they repeatedly pressure us to leave a review in the App Store, but as of this week, Apple is cutting back on those annoying prompts significantly. Apple is now making this possible by permitting tipping from within apps using in-app purchases.

The new App Review guidelines compel developers to use the official in-app rating UI that was added in iOS 10.3, and plans to "disallow custom review prompts" in the future. An app can only display the prompt three times a year, regardless of how often it's been updated. Apple introduced the rating prompt a few months ago, but it's been optional up until now. If the user decides not to leave a rating or a review, they won't have to see it over and over again every time they open the app.

The tipping option is not the only changes in the new App Store policies.

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The app, which was shoddily slapped together with poor English syntax and questionable security-compromising prompts, tells the user that their internet is "not safe" to use.

The developers will also need to determine how the tips that users send, minus Apple's 30 percent cut, will be distributed.

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